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The 32X port of ''Doom'' derives from the Atari Jaguar version, which adjusts level layouts in areas to ease with rendering, as well as potential hardware constraints, and/or aesthetics on a TV screen as opposed to a computer monitor. Despite this, the game managed to debut on the 32X before the Jaguar version was finalised. Leaked prototypes suggest that 32X ''Doom'' was originally more in-line with the PC version, the switching of levels occurring as an mid-development optimisation.
 
The 32X port of ''Doom'' derives from the Atari Jaguar version, which adjusts level layouts in areas to ease with rendering, as well as potential hardware constraints, and/or aesthetics on a TV screen as opposed to a computer monitor. Despite this, the game managed to debut on the 32X before the Jaguar version was finalised. Leaked prototypes suggest that 32X ''Doom'' was originally more in-line with the PC version, the switching of levels occurring as an mid-development optimisation.
  
32X ''Doom'' does not run at full screen - while the system is technically capable of rendering a full 320x224 ''Doom'' image, a border is applied to mitigate performance concerns in some areas. Many frames of animation are also missing - it is impossible, for example, to sneak up on enemies from the side, as only front-fracing sprites are included in the game and the engine was treaked to reflect this.
+
32X ''Doom'' does not run at full screen - while the system is technically capable of rendering a full 320x224 ''Doom'' image, a border is applied to mitigate performance concerns in some areas. Due to storage space limitations on a cartridge many decorative objects and textures are missing and monsters have only front-fracing sprites, albeit it's still possible to sneak up on enemies in rare cases as their behavior wasn't changed to take it into account. Demons wake up on sound only if player is directly present in their radius.
  
 
Interestingly, 32X version updates Automap in real-time when it's activated, while on PC the changes will show up only if you hide and view Automap again.
 
Interestingly, 32X version updates Automap in real-time when it's activated, while on PC the changes will show up only if you hide and view Automap again.
  
Due to storage space limitations on a cartridge, the 32X version contains a reduced set of levels from the PC version (including the entirety of the third chapter). The music was also noticeably changed, the developers deciding to remake the soundtrack with [[GEMS]] and keep it on the Mega Drive side only rather than use the 32X's PWM — having to make launch date didn't help the situation either. It is considered to house one of worst interpretations of ''Doom'''s music, with even the SNES surpassing it in terms of quality.
+
The levels set is shared with Atari Jaguar version, both being in development at the same time. Most likely 32X levels were being ported from Atari Jaguar in-progress builds. Atari Jaguar family levels set contains heavily simplified layout of levels from PC original, some maps being completely different, using less textures and objects as well. Due to 32X version being rushed it ended up being released before Atari Jaguar version thus the levels set is unfinished in comparison. It's missing the third episode and there are occasion glitches: Hall of Mirror effect in Level 10, for example. You can't finish levels 100% as some monsters were misplaced outside of rooms.
 +
 
 +
The music was also noticeably changed, the developers deciding to remake the soundtrack with [[GEMS]] and keep it on the Mega Drive side only rather than use the 32X's PWM — having to make launch date didn't help the situation either. It is considered to house one of worst interpretations of ''Doom'''s music, with even the SNES surpassing it in terms of quality.
  
 
The game now features a level select menu, allowing the player to select any level within the game; however, by using the level select, the game only presents the user with a DOS prompt at the end, instead of giving the true ending away. Curiously US manual mistakenly says that in such case the game will wrap back to the first level so player can complete the remaining ones.
 
The game now features a level select menu, allowing the player to select any level within the game; however, by using the level select, the game only presents the user with a DOS prompt at the end, instead of giving the true ending away. Curiously US manual mistakenly says that in such case the game will wrap back to the first level so player can complete the remaining ones.
  
Interestingly enough, even after the game was released to the market, the developers continued adding onto the game, with builds being leaked onto the internet in February 2008.
+
Interestingly enough, there are few builds of Doom 32X that were made after the final version. The files were named as "Doom RR", quite possible new revision was planned for the game. These builds contain no differences from final Doom 32X release much to public knowledge.
  
 
==History==
 
==History==
 
===Development===
 
===Development===
''Doom'' was originally slated to arrive on a 24Mb (3MB) ROM cartridge, but was upgraded to 32Mb (4MB), making it the largest 32X game in development at the time{{fileref|SegaMagazine UK 11.pdf|page=9}}. However the final game was released on 3MB ROM cartridge. Most likely it was due to the third episode levels being cut out to save development time in order to become [[Sega 32X]] launch title. If we take a look at the size of known prototypes of this game then we will see that prototypes between September 6 and September 21 were larger than 3MB, as well as October 2 build.
+
''Doom'' arrived on a 24Mb (3MB) ROM cartridge, albeit at some point of time it was reported that it will be upgraded from 24Mb to 32Mb (4MB), making it the largest 32X game in development at the time{{fileref|SegaMagazine UK 11.pdf|page=9}}. Most likely it didn't make it to 32Mb due to the third episode levels being cut out to save development time in order to become [[Sega 32X]] launch title. If we take a look at the size of known prototypes of this game then we will see that prototypes between September 6 and September 21 were larger than 3MB, as well as October 2 build.
 +
 
 +
Builds were leaked onto the internet in February 2008 on Hidden-Palace site.
  
 
==Production credits==
 
==Production credits==

Revision as of 10:07, 13 August 2017

For the Sega Saturn release, see Doom (Saturn).
n/a











Doom 32X Title.png
Doom
Publisher: Sega
Developer:
System(s): Sega 32X
Genre: Shoot-'em-Up






























Number of players: 1
Release Date RRP Code
Sega 32X
JP
¥7,800 GM-4003
Sega 32X
US
$69.99[1] 84506
Sega 32X
UK
£59.99[2] 84506-50
Sega 32X
FR
?F 84506-50
Sega 32X
DE
DM ? 84506-50
Sega 32X
ES
?Ptas 84506-50
Sega 32X
BR
R$? 152010
Sega 32X
AS
? ?



Doom (ドゥーム) is a first person shooter developed by id Software and released on December 10, 1993 for DOS-based IBM PC compatibles. It was later ported to numerous platforms, including the Sega 32X (as a launch title). It is widely considered to be one of the games that pioneered and popularized the first person shooter genre, and retains a large, dedicated fanbase to this day.

The player assumes the role of a nameless space marine and through use of a varied set of weaponry, must fight his way through moonbases on Mars and the depths of Hell itself.

Gameplay

The game is played through the eyes of the main character. The player navigates through the level and collects weapons, ammunition, powerups, and other miscellaneous items. Certain doors are locked via a red, blue, or yellow keycard which are hidden throughout the level. Eventually the player finds the exit and progresses to the next level. Every so often a boss is encountered, where the level ends upon defeating the boss.

Levels are often made more varied by use of gimmicks and traps such as elevators, poisonous pits, monster closets, and secret rooms.

Controls

General

D-Pad - Moves character. Holding A while using D-Pad moves character at running speed. Holding C while using D-Pad makes character strafe instead.
B - Fire.
C - Use (Open/close door; Activate switch).

When in Automap:
D-Pad - Moves character.
A - Zoom in.
B - Zoom out.
C - Activates/deactivates grid.

Start - Pauses with options menu; Resumes.

You can swap A, B and C button functions around in options. It will also affect automap controls.

3-Button Mode

Pressing Start while holding A - Scroll through available weapons.
Pressing Start while holding C - View Automap.

When in Automap:
Pressing Start while holding A - Toogle Follow mode on/off.
Pressing Start while holding C - Hide Automap.

US manual has wrong information about Automap controls for 3-button controllers, futher contributing to rushed feel of this title.

6-Button Mode

X - Scroll up through available weapons.
Y - Scroll down through available weapons.
Z - View Automap.

When in Automap:
X - Toogle Follow mode on/off.
Y - Scale up or down instantly.
Z - Hide Automap.

Pressing any button aside from D-Pad while holding Mode will bring up a corresponding weapon. Examples: Mode + Start brings up fists/chainsaw (pressing again switches between them if player has Berserk Pack), Mode + A brings up pistol, etc.

Using Six Button Control Pad is highly recommended. Cheats also require use of buttons that aren't available on Three Button Control Pad.

Differences to the PC version

The 32X port of Doom derives from the Atari Jaguar version, which adjusts level layouts in areas to ease with rendering, as well as potential hardware constraints, and/or aesthetics on a TV screen as opposed to a computer monitor. Despite this, the game managed to debut on the 32X before the Jaguar version was finalised. Leaked prototypes suggest that 32X Doom was originally more in-line with the PC version, the switching of levels occurring as an mid-development optimisation.

32X Doom does not run at full screen - while the system is technically capable of rendering a full 320x224 Doom image, a border is applied to mitigate performance concerns in some areas. Due to storage space limitations on a cartridge many decorative objects and textures are missing and monsters have only front-fracing sprites, albeit it's still possible to sneak up on enemies in rare cases as their behavior wasn't changed to take it into account. Demons wake up on sound only if player is directly present in their radius.

Interestingly, 32X version updates Automap in real-time when it's activated, while on PC the changes will show up only if you hide and view Automap again.

The levels set is shared with Atari Jaguar version, both being in development at the same time. Most likely 32X levels were being ported from Atari Jaguar in-progress builds. Atari Jaguar family levels set contains heavily simplified layout of levels from PC original, some maps being completely different, using less textures and objects as well. Due to 32X version being rushed it ended up being released before Atari Jaguar version thus the levels set is unfinished in comparison. It's missing the third episode and there are occasion glitches: Hall of Mirror effect in Level 10, for example. You can't finish levels 100% as some monsters were misplaced outside of rooms.

The music was also noticeably changed, the developers deciding to remake the soundtrack with GEMS and keep it on the Mega Drive side only rather than use the 32X's PWM — having to make launch date didn't help the situation either. It is considered to house one of worst interpretations of Doom's music, with even the SNES surpassing it in terms of quality.

The game now features a level select menu, allowing the player to select any level within the game; however, by using the level select, the game only presents the user with a DOS prompt at the end, instead of giving the true ending away. Curiously US manual mistakenly says that in such case the game will wrap back to the first level so player can complete the remaining ones.

Interestingly enough, there are few builds of Doom 32X that were made after the final version. The files were named as "Doom RR", quite possible new revision was planned for the game. These builds contain no differences from final Doom 32X release much to public knowledge.

History

Development

Doom arrived on a 24Mb (3MB) ROM cartridge, albeit at some point of time it was reported that it will be upgraded from 24Mb to 32Mb (4MB), making it the largest 32X game in development at the time[3]. Most likely it didn't make it to 32Mb due to the third episode levels being cut out to save development time in order to become Sega 32X launch title. If we take a look at the size of known prototypes of this game then we will see that prototypes between September 6 and September 21 were larger than 3MB, as well as October 2 build.

Builds were leaked onto the internet in February 2008 on Hidden-Palace site.

Production credits

Source: In-game credits
id Software Development Team
  • John Carmack, John Romero, Adrian Carmack, Kevin Cloud, Sandy Peterson, David Taylor, American McGee, Shawn Green
Sega of America Development Team
  • Programming: Jonathan E. Flamm, Banjo Bob Hardy, Toshiyasu Monita, Marty Franz, Rex Sabio, Unni Pillai
  • Music: Brian Coburn
  • Art: Jenny Martin
  • Producer: Jesse K. Taylor
  • Software Testing: Mike Baldwin, Joel Breton, Chris Lucich, Matt Underwood, Fernando Valderrama, Kim Rogers, Ben Cureton, Lloyd Kinoshita, Alfred Dutton, Sam Sallba, Stan Weaver, Mike Mansourian, Carey Camacho, Aaron Hommes, Jeff Loney
  • Special Thanks To: Jay Wilbur, Dave Albert, JBM III
Source: US manualMedia:Doom 32x us manual.pdf[4]
  • Biz Guy: Jay Wilbur
  • Biz Assistant: Donna Jackson
  • Software Engineers: John Carmack, John Romero, Dave Taylor, Shawn Green
  • Artists: Adrian Carmack, Kevin Cloud
  • Designers: Sandy Peterson, American McGee
  • Composer: Robert Prince
  • Doom Logo: Don Punchatz
Sega
  • Producer: Jesse Taylor
  • Assistant Producers: Vincent Nason, Greg Becksted
  • Product Manager: Tim Dunley
  • Product Specialist: Nemer Velasquez
  • Programming: Jonathan Flamm, Robert Hardy, Unni Pillai, Toshi Morita
  • Art: Jenny Martin, Susan Greene
  • Music: Brian Coburn
  • Game Lead: Michael Baldwin
  • Assistant Game Leads: Joel Breton, Christopher Lucich, Matt Underwood
  • Testers: Fernando Valderrama, Aaron Loichinger, Kim Rogers, Ben Cureton, Lloyd Kinoshita, Aaron Hommes
  • Manual: Carol Ann Hanshaw, Jay Wilbur
  • Special Thanks: Haven Dubrul, David Albert, Robert W. Lindsey, Doria Sanchez

Magazine articles

Main article: Doom (32X)/Magazine articles.

Promotional material

Television advertisements

Physical scans

Sega Retro Average 
Publication Score Source
94 №158, p72-74[5]
84 №66, p40[6]
83
87
91 №25, p63
91 №8, p16
92 №37, p94[7]
95 №27, p20-23
92 №34 (Supp.), p22-25[8]
87 №1/95, p31[9]
92 №27, p76-78[10]
95 №48, p64/65
78
96 №12, p70/71
95 №63, p50-52
94 №40, p40/41
84 №56, p24
91 №2, p97[11]
Sega 32X
90
Based on
18 reviews

32X, US
Doom 32X US Box Back.jpgDoom 32X US Box Front.jpg
Cover
Doom 32X US Cart.jpg
Cart
Doom 32x us manual.pdf
Manual
32X, EU
Doom 32X EU Box.jpg
Cover
Doom 32X EU cart.jpg
Cart
32X, JP
Doom 32X JP Box Back.jpgDoom MD JP BoxSpine.jpgDoom 32X JP Box Front.jpg
Cover
Doom MD JP CartTop.jpg
Doom 32X JP Cart Back.jpgDoom 32X JP cart.jpg
Cart
Doom 32x jp manual.pdf
Manual
32X, BR
Doom 32X BR Box.jpg
Cover
Doom 32X BR Cart.jpg
Cart
32X, Asia
Doom 32X Asia Box Front.jpg
Cover
Doom 32X AS cartback.jpgDoom 32X AS cart.jpg
Cart

Technical information

ROM dump status

System Hash Size Build Date Source Comments
Sega 32X
CRC32
MD5
SHA-1
1995-03-07
Sega 32X
CRC32
MD5
SHA-1
1995-02-21
Sega 32X
CRC32
MD5
SHA-1
1995-02-15
Sega 32X
CRC32
MD5
SHA-1
1994-12-01
Sega 32X
CRC32
MD5
SHA-1
Cartridge
Sega 32X
CRC32
MD5
SHA-1
1994-10-08
Sega 32X
CRC32
MD5
SHA-1
1994-10-08
Sega 32X
CRC32
MD5
SHA-1
1994-10-02
Sega 32X
CRC32
MD5
SHA-1
1994-09-28
Sega 32X
CRC32
MD5
SHA-1
1994-09-27
Sega 32X
CRC32
MD5
SHA-1
1994-09-25
Sega 32X
CRC32
MD5
SHA-1
1994-09-23
Sega 32X
CRC32
MD5
SHA-1
1994-09-21
Sega 32X
CRC32
MD5
SHA-1
1994-09-16
Sega 32X
CRC32
MD5
SHA-1
1994-09-14
Sega 32X
CRC32
MD5
SHA-1
1994-09-09
Sega 32X
CRC32
MD5
SHA-1
1994-09-06

References

Necretro-round.svg
NEC Retro has more information related to Doom.
  1. File:GamePro US 065.pdf, page 64
  2. File:CVG UK 158.pdf, page 73
  3. File:SegaMagazine UK 11.pdf, page 9
  4. File:Doom 32x us manual.pdf, page 22
  5. File:CVG UK 158.pdf, page 72
  6. File:EGM US 066.pdf, page 40
  7. File:Joypad FR 037.pdf, page 94
  8. File:MegaForce FR Supplement 34.pdf, page 22
  9. File:MegaFun DE 1995-01.pdf, page 31
  10. File:MeanMachinesSega27UK.pdf, page 76
  11. File:UltimateFutureGames UK 02.pdf, page 87