Difference between revisions of "Mega Drive RPGs"

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{{GenreCatNav|Mega Drive}}
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{{GenreCatNav|Mega Drive}}[[File:Genre_rpg.png|right]]
[[File:Genre_rpg.png|right]]Though not particularly well known for its RPGs or for having many, the [[Sega Mega Drive]] did have a fair enough amount of them, from [[Sega]]'s own flagships in the ''[[:Category:Phantasy Star|Phantasy Star]]'' and ''[[:Category:Shining|Shining]]'' series to various third-party efforts by a number of smaller developers to the Chinese unlicensed game market. Many of the more coveted RPGs were only released in Japan, and both hobbyists and commercial outings like [[Super Fighter Team]] work to bridge both the regional gap and the quantitative gap in the genre.
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Though not particularly well known for its RPGs or for having many, the [[Sega Mega Drive]] did have a fair enough amount of them, from [[Sega]]'s own flagships in the ''[[:Category:Phantasy Star|Phantasy Star]]'' and ''[[:Category:Shining|Shining]]'' series to various third-party efforts by a number of smaller developers to the Chinese unlicensed game market.
  
Points worth noting:
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[[Category:Mega Drive games by genre]]
*''[[Shining in the Darkness]]'' was the inaugural game in the series.
 
*''[[Phantasy Star]]'' was repackaged for the Mega Drive for a Japanese magazine contest; this is just the [[Sega Master System]] version in a Mega Drive cart and the appropriate mode pin set (as the Mega Drive can play Master System games if the game's cart has a certain pin lifted)
 
*''[[Madou Monogatari I]]'' was the last officially licensed Mega Drive game released in Japan
 
*''[[Pier Solar and the Great Architects]]'' was the first commercial homebrew Mega Drive game released internationally that was not a translation of a Chinese game
 
 
 
[[Category:Mega Drive Games]]
 

Latest revision as of 08:10, 19 May 2018

Genre rpg.png

Though not particularly well known for its RPGs or for having many, the Sega Mega Drive did have a fair enough amount of them, from Sega's own flagships in the Phantasy Star and Shining series to various third-party efforts by a number of smaller developers to the Chinese unlicensed game market.