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Sega NAOMI 2

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Fast facts on Sega NAOMI 2
Manufacturer: Sega
Variants: Sega NAOMI 2 GD-ROM, Sega NAOMI 2 Satellite Terminal
Add-ons: GD-ROM
Main processor: Hitachi SH-4
Release Date RRP Code
Arcade
World
2000 171‑8082C



The Sega NAOMI 2 is an arcade board developed by Sega and is a successor to Sega NAOMI hardware. It was originally released in 2000. Since it uses similar NAOMI architecture (but significantly beefed up), it is also fully backwards compatible with its predecessor.

The NAOMI 2 is significantly more powerful than the NAOMI, including a dual CPU setup, new T&L GPU, dual rasterizer GPU, increased memory, and faster bandwidth. This leads to games with much more polygons than a NAOMI game, rendered at much faster speeds, while the new T&L GPU adds advanced lighting and particle effects. It was also more affordable than the very expensive (and difficult to program) Sega Hikaru arcade system that preceded it.

As with the NAOMI, the NAOMI 2 was also available in GD-ROM and Satellite Terminal variants. It was Sega's last proprietary arcade system board; subsequent Sega arcade boards have been based on console and PC hardware.

Development

VideoLogic's Elan, the T&L geometry GPU coprocessor used in the NAOMI 2, had been in development since 1998, when the original NAOMI arcade system and Dreamcast console launched.[1] Yu Suzuki was involved in its development, insisting that it must have enough power to sustain in-game performance of at least 10 million polygons per second will all effects enabled.[2] It was also more affordable than the very expensive (and difficult to program) Sega Hikaru arcade system that preceded it.[3]

Technical Specifications

NAOMI 2 Specifications

  • Main CPU: Hitachi SH‑4[4] @ 200 MHz[5][6]
    • Units: 128‑bit SIMD vector units with graphic functions, 2× 64‑bit floating‑point units, 2× 32‑bit fixed‑point units
    • Bus width: 128‑bit internal, 64‑bit external
    • Bandwidth: 3.2 GB/s internal, 1.6 GB/s external
    • Fixed‑point performance: 360 MIPS
    • SH‑4 floating‑point performance: 1.4 GFLOPS
    • Note: With Elan used as geometry coprocessor, the SH‑4's 128‑bit SIMD matrix unit can be dedicated to game physics, artificial intelligence, collision detection, overall game code, or further enhancing graphics. CPU load is reduced by 90% with Elan.[7]
  • Sound engine: Yamaha AICA Super Intelligent Sound Processor @ 67 MHz
    • Internal CPU: 32‑bit ARM7 RISC CPU @ 45 MHz
    • CPU performance: 17 MIPS
    • PCM/ADPCM: 16‑bit depth, 48 kHz sampling rate (DVD quality), 128 channels
    • Other features: DSP, sound synthesizer
  • PLD: 4 PLD[n 1]
    • Altera FLEX EPF8452AQC160‑3 FPGA @ 125 MHz[n 2]
    • Sega 315‑6188 (Altera EPC1064PC8) FPGA Configuration Device @ 6 MHz[n 3]
    • Sega 315‑6268 (Altera EPM7032AELC44‑10) CPLD @ 103.1 MHz[n 4]
    • Sega 315‑6269 (Altera MAX EPM7064AETC100‑10) CPLD @ 100 MHz[n 5]
  • Operating systems:
  • Storage media: ROM cartridge
  • Extensions: communication, 4‑channel surround sound, PCI, MIDI, RS‑232C
  • Connection: JAMMA Video compliant

Graphics

  • GPU: 6 core processors (Elan, SH‑4 SIMD, 2× PowerVR2, 2 DAC)
    • Core units: 14 units (Elan, SH‑4 SIMD, 10 PowerVR2 cores, 2 DAC)
    • Clock rate: 200 MHz
  • GPU T&L geometry coprocessor: VideoLogic Elan @ 100 MHz
  • GPU rasterizers: 2× NEC‑VideoLogic PowerVR2 @ 100 MHz
  • Video DAC: 2× Rohm BU1426KS @ 35.4695 MHz[22]
    • Bus width: 48‑bit (2× 24‑bit)
  • Color depth: 32‑bit ARGB, 16,777,216 colors (24‑bit color) with 8‑bit (256 levels) alpha blending, YUV and RGB color spaces, color key overlay[23]
  • Display resolution: 31 kHz horizontal sync, 60 Hz refresh rate, JAMMA/VGA,[24] progressive scan
    • Single monitor: 496×384 to 800×608 pixels[25]
    • Dual monitor: 992×768 to 1600×608 pixels
  • Rendering fillrate:
  • Texture fillrate:[n 12]
    • 12 GTexels/s: Maximum fillrate for opaque polygons
    • 2 GTexel/s: Average fillrate for translucent and opaque polygons
    • 400 MTexels/s: Minimum fillrate for translucent polygons with hardware sort depth of 60
  • Textures per pass: 10 texture layers[12]
  • Floating-point performance: 11 GFLOPS
    • Elan: 7.5 GFLOPS geometry
    • SH-4 SIMD: 1.4 GFLOPS geometry
    • PowerVR2: 2.1 GFLOPS rendering
  • T&L geometry: 8.7 GFLOPS[n 13]
    • Matrix transformations: 240 million vertices/sec[n 14]
    • Perspective transformations: 210 million vertices/sec[n 15]
    • 1 light source: 110 million vertices/sec[n 16]
    • 4 light sources: 26 million vertices/sec[n 17]
    • 6 light sources: 18 million vertices/sec[n 18]
  • Polygon rendering performance: Gouraud shading
    • 100 million polygons/sec: 1 light source[12]
    • 26 million polygons/sec: 4 light sources, texture mapping
    • 10 million polygons/sec: 6 light sources, texture mapping

Memory

Bandwidth

  • Internal processor cache bandwidth:
  • RAM/ROM memory bandwidth: 16.1 GB/s (15.1 GB/s system, 1 GB/s cartridge)
    • Video memory: 14.01 GB/s (13.01 GB/s VRAM, 900 MB/s ROM)
  • System RAM bandwidth: 10 GB/s[4]
  • System ROM bandwidth: 88 MB/s[4]
  • Cartridge ROM bandwidth: 900 MB/s[n 42]
    • Note: High‑speed access allows ROM to effectively be used as RAM, and textures streamed directly from ROM.[47]
  • Cartridge RAM bandwidth: 100 MB/s[n 43]

NAOMI 2 GD-ROM Specifications

The NAOMI GD‑ROM, released in 2001, is identical to the standard NAOMI, but uses GD‑ROM discs for storage instead of ROM cartridges. It comes with a DIMM Board, which is very similar to a ROM cartridge, but with RAM instead of ROM. When a game is installed, the GD‑ROM content is loaded onto the DIMM Board RAM, so that the game data runs from the DIMM Board rather than the GD‑ROM disc. The NAOMI 2 GD‑ROM specification includes the following differences:

  • Board composition: Motherboard + Daughter Board + DIMM Board
  • Storage media: GD‑ROM drive
    • GD‑ROM transfer rate: 1.8 MB/s (1800 KB/sec)

Memory

  • RAM: 392–648 MB (SDRAM)
    • Main RAM: 32 MB
    • VRAM: 96 MB
    • Sound RAM: 8 MB
    • DIMM RAM: 256–512 MB[48]
  • L2 cache: 256 KB
  • ROM: 26 MB
    • System ROM: 2048.25 KB[n 44]
    • DIMM ROM: 24 MB (EPROM)

Bandwidth

  • RAM bandwidth: 11–12 GB/s
    • Main RAM: 1.6 GB/s
    • VRAM: 8.4 GB/s
    • Sound RAM: 132 MB/s
    • SRAM: 44 MB/s
    • DIMM RAM: 1.1–2.13 GB/s[n 45]

List of Games

NAOMI 2 Games

NAOMI 2 GD-ROM Games

NAOMI 2 Satellite Terminal Games

Notes

  1. 49 units, 656‑bit internal, 224‑bit external, 125 MHz, 9.25 GB/s[4]
  2. 42 units, 336‑bit (42× 8‑bit) internal, 120‑bit external,[8] 5.3 GB/s
  3. 8‑bit,[9] 6 MB/s
  4. 2 units, 104‑bit (2× 52‑bit) internal, 32‑bit (2× 16‑bit) external,[10] 1.3403 GB/s
  5. 4 units, 208‑bit (4× 52‑bit) internal, 64‑bit (4× 16‑bit) external,[10] 2.6 GB/s
  6. 75 floating-point operations per cycle
  7. Scaled for high-end arcade technology,[13] with parallel ISP cores and increased PE processing elements within processor.[14] NAOMI 2 has average fillrate of 2 gigapixels/sec, twice that of the NAOMI's average 1 gigapixel/sec fillrate,[15] which in turn is twice that of the Dreamcast's average 500 megapixels/sec fillrate.[16]
  8. 14 cycles/polygon per ISP FPU, 51 floating-point operations per polygon, 204 floating-point operations per 14 cyclesMedia:DreamcastDevBoxSystemArchitecture.pdf[18]Media:DreamcastDevBoxSystemArchitecture.pdf[19]
  9. 32 pixels/cycle per ISP,1 pixel per PE (processor element), 128 PE (32 PE per ISP, 64 PE per PowerVR2), 6 gigapixels/sec per PowerVR2 (3.2 gigapixels/sec per ISP)
  10. 20 pixels per cycle, 6 PEs (processor elements) per pixel, 1 gigapixel per PowerVR2 (500 megapixels/sec per ISP)
  11. 60 layers depth, 4 pixels per cycle (2 pixels per PowerVR2), 32 PEs per pixel, 200 megapixels/sec per PowerVR2 (100 megapixels/sec per ISP)
  12. Same as pixel rendering fillrate
  13. Elan: 7.5 GFLOPS (75 floating-point operations per cycle)
    SH‑4 SIMD: 180 MHz available (10% load, 20 MHz used), 1.26 GFLOPS (90% of 1.4 GFLOPS)
  14. Elan: 200 million vertices/sec (28 floating-point operations per transform,[26] 2 transforms per cycle)
    SH-4: 45 million vertices/sec (4 cycles per transform)[27]
  15. Elan: 200 million vertices/sec, 31 floating-point operations per vertex (28 operations for matrix transform,[26] 3 operations for perspective division),[28] 2 transforms per cycle
    SH-4: 15 million vertices/sec, 12 cycles per vertex (4 cycles matrix transform,[27] 5 cycles perspective division),[28] 12 cycles division latency[29]
  16. Elan: 100 million vertices/sec (63 floating-point operations per vertex,[30] 1 vertex per cycle)
    SH-4: 12 million vertices/sec, 14 cycles per vertex (4 cycles matrix transformation, 5 cycles perspective division, 1 cycle surface normal, 4 cycles lighting matrix)[31][32]
  17. Elan: 20 million vertices/sec, 5 cycles per vertex (1 cycle transform, 1 cycle per light source)
    SH-4: 6 million vertices/sec, 29 cycles per vertex (4 cycles matrix transformation, 5 cycles perspective division, 1 cycle per surface normal, 4 cycles per lighting matrix)
  18. Elan: 14 million vertices/sec, 7 cycles per vertex (1 cycle transform, 1 cycle per light source)
    SH-4: 4 million vertices/sec, 39 cycles per vertex (4 cycles matrix transformation, 5 cycles perspective division, 1 cycle per surface normal, 4 cycles per lighting matrix)
  19. 432,206 bytes
  20. 288,322 bytes: 8 KB instruction cache, 16 KB data cache, 64 bytes store queue cache, 1538 bytes registers, 256 KB L2 cache[12]
  21. 94,208 bytes: 16.5 KB register memory, 49 KB ISP cache, 26 KB TSP cache, 512 bytes FIFO buffer
  22. 32,780 bytes: 32 KB sound registers, 8 bytes RTC registers, 4 bytes FIFO buffer
  23. 16,896 bytes: 512 bytes RAM, 16 KB ROM[34]
  24. 2× 32 MB
  25. 2 MB BIOS EPROM, 256 bytes EEPROM[4]
  26. 24 MB EPROM,[36] 144–256 MB FlashROM/MROM
  27. 128–448 MB FlashROM, 0–40 MB EPROM, 128 KB Flash PROM[37]
  28. 128‑bit, 200 MHz
  29. 512‑bit, 100 MHz
  30. 2x 2304‑bit, 100 MHz: 2x 32-bit TA tile buffer,Media:DreamcastDevBoxSystemArchitecture.pdf[38] 4x 32-bit ISP registers, 2x 32-bit TSP registers,[39] 4x 1024-bit ISP PE Arrays,[14] 2x 64-bit TSP Texture Cache,Media:DreamcastDevBoxSystemArchitecture.pdf[40] 2x 32-bit TSP Tile Accumulation Buffer, 2x 32-bit Secondary Accumulation Buffer
  31. 48‑bit, 35.4695 MHz
  32. 32‑bit, 67 MHz
  33. 656‑bit, 125 MHz
  34. 128‑bit, 100 MHz[41]
  35. 512‑bit, 100 MHz[11]
  36. 128‑bit, 125 MHz[42]
  37. 16‑bit, 66 MHz
  38. 16‑bit, 22 MHz[35]
  39. 8‑bit, 6 MHz[9]
  40. 16‑bit, 40 MHz[43][44]
  41. 2× 16‑bit, 2 MHz[45]
  42. 50 MHz[46]
  43. 16‑bit, 50 MHz
  44. 24 MB BIOS EPROM, 256 bytes EEPROM
  45. 1/2× 64‑bit, 133 MHz[49][50]

References

  1. NEC Introduces PowerVR 3-D Engine (09/23/98)
  2. File:NextGeneration US 77.pdf, page 61
  3. File:NextGeneration US 76.pdf, page 37
  4. 4.0 4.1 4.2 4.3 4.4 4.5 4.6 Sega NAOMI / NAOMI 2 (MAME)
  5. 5.0 5.1 File:DCUK 16.pdf, page 41
  6. File:SH-4 Software Manual.pdf
  7. 7.0 7.1 Press release: 2000-09-21: Sega Announces NAOMI2 Next Generation Arcade Systems Using Imagination Technologies’ PowerVR Graphics Architecture
  8. File:EPF8452A datasheet.pdf
  9. 9.0 9.1 9.2 File:EPC1064 datasheet.pdf
  10. 10.0 10.1 File:EPM7032AE datasheet.pdf
  11. 11.0 11.1 File:UPD4564323 datasheet.pdf
  12. 12.0 12.1 12.2 12.3 NAOMI 2 Specifications (May 31, 2001)
  13. File:PowerVR.pdf, page 2
  14. 14.0 14.1 14.2 File:PowerVR.pdf, page 3
  15. Press release: 1998-09-17: SEGA SELECTS POWERVR SERIES2 AS 3D GRAPHICS TECHNOLOGY FOR NEW ARCADE SYSTEM
  16. File:Edge UK 067.pdf, page 11
  17. File:DreamcastDevBoxSystemArchitecture.pdf, page 110
  18. 18.0 18.1 File:DreamcastDevBoxSystemArchitecture.pdf, page 95
  19. File:DreamcastDevBoxSystemArchitecture.pdf, page 203
  20. JAMMA 2000: NAOMI 2 Revealed (September 20, 2000)
  21. File:NAOMI 1998 Press Release JP.pdf
  22. File:BU142 datasheet.pdf
  23. Neon 250 Specs & Features
  24. Sega Naomi Universal
  25. Dreamcast Video (KallistiOS)
  26. 26.0 26.1 Design of Digital Systems and Devices (page 95)
  27. 27.0 27.1 File:SH-4 Next-Generation DSP Architecture.pdf, page 12
  28. 28.0 28.1 Dreamcast: Basic matrix operations (KallistiOS)
  29. File:SH-4 Software Manual.pdf, page 211
  30. Design of Digital Systems and Devices (page 96)
  31. File:SH-4 Software Manual.pdf, page 151
  32. File:SH-4 Next-Generation DSP Architecture.pdf, page 31
  33. File:DreamcastDevBoxSystemArchitecture.pdf
  34. File:TMP90PH44 datasheet.pdf
  35. 35.0 35.1 File:HM62256B datasheet.pdf
  36. Club Kart: European Session (MAME)
  37. File:XCF01S datasheet.pdf
  38. File:DreamcastDevBoxSystemArchitecture.pdf, page 165
  39. PowerVR (Dreamcast Hardware)
  40. File:DreamcastDevBoxSystemArchitecture.pdf, page 96
  41. File:HM5264 datasheet.pdf
  42. File:HY57V161610D datasheet.pdf
  43. File:CY2292 datasheet.pdf
  44. File:M27C160 datasheet.pdf
  45. File:AT93C46 datasheet.pdf
  46. File:S29GL-N datasheet.pdf
  47. Hideki Sato Sega Inteview (Edge)
  48. Sega NAOMI DIMM board and GD-ROM
  49. Sega Naomi DIMM board and GD-ROM
  50. File:M366S3323CT0 datasheet.pdf
Sega Arcade Boards
Originating in Arcades
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Blockade G80 Hang-On / Space Harrier Model 1 H1 Model 3 NAOMI 2
VIC Dual System 1 System 24 NAOMI
VCO Object LaserDisc System SP
System 2 System 18
System 16
OutRun System 32
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RingEdge
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