World Series Baseball (Mega Drive)

From Sega Retro

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WorldSeriesBaseball MD title.png

World Series Baseball
System(s): Sega Mega Drive
Publisher: Sega
Developer:
Licensor: Major League Baseball Properties, Major League Baseball Players Association
Sound driver: GEMS
Genre: Sports

















Number of players: 1-2
Release Date RRP Code
Sega Mega Drive
US
$59.9959.99[3] 1222
Videogame Rating Council: GA
Sega Mega Drive
BR
046120

World Series Baseball is a 1994 baseball game by Sega and BlueSky Software released for the Sega Mega Drive in the US. It is an entry in the World Series Baseball series. It is the first baseball game for the platform to have licenses from both the MLB and the MLBPA, so it has all of the players and teams from the 1994 season.

It was followed by World Series Baseball '95 for the Mega Drive. A World Series Baseball game, most likely a port of this version, was also once planned for release on the Sega Mega-CD[4][5]. This version would have had a "3D field view" and was originally set for release in October 1993[6].

Gameplay

The game takes a more realistic, simulation-style approach compared to the more simplified, arcade-style approach taken by other baseball games of the time. It uses a low angle from the perspective of the catcher for pitching and hitting and employs control schemes that try to more authentically reproduce the depth and strategy of baseball. Players can choose from any of the 28 teams from the 1994 MLB season. All 28 ballparks were recreated for the game, including their scoreboards, with details such as the ivy wall at Wrigley Field or the "Green Monster" at Fenway Park. Like its predecessor, Sports Talk Baseball, it has spoken commentary.

  • Exhibition: A single game against a human or computer player. The player can also watch two computer-controlled teams play.
  • League: Plays a season of games that culminate in the World Series. The player can choose the number of games (13, 26, 52, or a full 162 games) and the number of divisions (4 or 6). The game uses a battery backup to save the player's progress.
  • Home Run Derby: Players have 10 attempts to hit as many home runs as possible. A missed attempt is a hit that is not a home run; there are no strike-outs. The player can choose the pitch speed (70-79, 80-89, or 90-99 mph). This mode can be played by up to 8 players taking turns.
  • Batting Practice: The player practices batting. There are no outs in this mode. The player can select a left- or right-handed pitcher, a left- or right-handed batter, the type of pitch, the speed of the pitch, and the venue.

Before each game, players choose a team. Players set the batting order and can also change the defensive position of each player and make substitutions. Players choose the starting pitcher and can have two relief pitchers warm up in the bullpen. Starting pitchers have more stamina than relief pitchers, but relievers can warm up to their maximum stamina while in the bullpen.

In the game options, players can select the difficulty for pitching and batting separately (Rookie, Veteran, or All-Star) and toggle auto-fielding.

World Series Baseball MD, Defense, Pitching.png

World Series Baseball MD, Defense, Fielding.png

World Series Baseball MD, Defense, Strategy.png

  • World Series Baseball MD, Defense, Pitching.png

  • World Series Baseball MD, Defense, Fielding.png

  • World Series Baseball MD, Defense, Strategy.png

Defense
On each pitch, the player positions the pitch using the D-Pad and chooses the type of pitch to throw with A, B, or C. Each pitcher has a repertoire of three pitches from eight different possible pitches (fastball, split-finger, slider, sinker, curveball, change-up, screwball, or knuckleball). The strike zone appears in brackets in the center of the screen.

After choosing the type of pitch and its position, the player chooses the speed of the throw: A for slow, B for medium, or C for fast. The pitcher can also throw to base with the D-Pad (Right for first, Up for second, or Left for third) to pick-off runners trying to steal a base or throw a pitchout (a pitch deliberately thrown outside of the strike zone to make it easier to catch) with Down to prevent baserunners from stealing a base or to thwart a squeeze play.

When fielding, the D-Pad controls the player closest to the ball. If auto-fielding is enabled, the fielders automatically move toward any ball hit near them. The position of the ball is highlighted with a yellow circle when it is near the ground. The player can have the nearest fielder dive for the ball by pressing B while holding a direction or jump by pressing B while the fielder is standing still. Once the ball is in possession, it can be thrown to base by pressing C while holding a direction corresponding to the base (Right for first, Up for second, Left for third, or Down for home). If no direction is held, the ball is thrown to the cut-off man or to the pitcher.

The player can call a time-out with  START  to warm up relievers, substitute pitchers or fielders, play a replay, or check the scoreboard. There is also the ability to change the defensive strategy by changing the depth and shift of outfielders and infielders.

World Series Baseball MD, Offense, Hitting.png

World Series Baseball MD, Offense, Running.png

  • World Series Baseball MD, Offense, Hitting.png

  • World Series Baseball MD, Offense, Running.png

Offense
Before each pitch, the player chooses the type of swing: A for contact, B for normal, or C for power. Contact is a light hit to put the ball into play; power is a hard hit to try to get a run. The strike zone appears in brackets in the center of the screen. Hitting comes down to aim and timing. The player moves a circular reticle at the ball with the D-Pad and swings with C or bunts with A. As in real baseball, pitchers throw a variety of pitches to try to confuse the batter. On Rookie difficulty, the player does not need to aim the hit and only needs to swing.

After selecting the type of swing, runners can be instructed to lead-off by holding B while tapping a direction on the D-Pad corresponding to the base that the runner is currently on ((Right for first, Up for second, or Left for third, or Down for all baserunners). Runners can attempt to steal a base by holding B while holding a direction on the D-Pad.

When running, the player can slide to base with C. The player can control the runners on base by holding a direction on the D-Pad (Right for first, Up for second, Left for third, or Down for all baserunners) with B to run to the next base or A to return to base.

The player can call a time-out with  START  to make substitutions, play a replay, or check the scoreboard.

Teams

League Division Team
American Western California Angels
Oakland Athletics
Seattle Mariners
Texas Rangers
Central Chicago White Sox
Cleveland Indians
Kansas City Royals
Milwaukee Brewers
Minnesota Twins
Eastern Baltimore Orioles
Boston Red Sox
Detroit Tigers
New York Yankees
Toronto Blue Jays
National Western Colorado Rockies
Los Angeles Dodgers
San Diego Padres
San Francisco Giants
Central Chicago Cubs
Cincinnati Reds
Houston Astros
Pittsburgh Pirates
St. Louis Cardinals
Eastern Atlanta Braves
Florida Marlins
Montreal Expos
New York Mets
Philadelphia Phillies

Production credits

A Bluesky Production in Segavision
Speech System Development: Western Technologies
  • Sportstalk: Alan Maynard (Allen Maynard), Joe Shands, Fletcher Beasley
  • Speech Programmer: Alan Maynard
  • Sound Effects, Speech Compression Technology, Electronic Speech Systems: Fletcher Beasley
Credits (cont.)
  • Batting Grids and Pitching Charts: Baseball Analysis and Reporting System [BARS]
  • Career Player Statistics: The Baseball Workshop
  • Music: Sam Powell
  • Lead Tester: Vincent Nason
  • Testers: Todd Morgan, Stephen Bourdet, Jerry DeYoung, John Amirkhan, Michael Baldwin, Greg Becksted, Dusty Bedford, Michael Bench, Daniel Caraballo, Glen A. Cureton, Chris Cutliff, Daniel P. Dunn, Mark Fabela, Eric Fong, Richard Gangwish, Lawrence Gibson, Roman Greco, Rick Greer, Randall Hauser, Tracy Johnson, Darin Johnston, Dan Jung, Jeff Junio, Kevin Labounty, Jeffrey L. Loney, Michael Madden, Julio Martinez, Lancelot Nelson, Mike Palser, Christopher Pepper, Kevin Seiter, Timothy Spengler, Siegfried Stangenberg, Mark Subotnick, Terry Thomas, Conan Tigard, Matt Underwood, Gregg Vogt, Paul Walker, Greg Watkins (Gregg Watkins), Christine Watson, Richard Wong (Rich Wong)
  • Marketing: Doug Rebert, Kelly Ryan
  • Manual: Mike Yoffie
  • Special Thanks to: Ronald Thompson, George Kiss, Jennifer Cleary (Jennifer Cleary-Haney), Trevor Bostelaar, Jason Weesner, Michael McMahon, Chris Gill, Jason Gill, W. T. Safooa, Joe Miller, Jeff Moses, Gary Gillette, Lori Niwa, Stephen Patterson, George Degolian, Norman Wood
Source:
US manual
World Series Baseball MD US Manual.pdf
[7]

Magazine articles

Main article: World Series Baseball (Mega Drive)/Magazine articles.

Promotional material

Logo-pdf.svg
Print advert in Electronic Gaming Monthly (US) #57: "April 1994" (1994-xx-xx)
Logo-pdf.svg
Print advert in SuperGamePower (BR) #7: "Outubro 1994" (1994-xx-xx)

Physical scans

Sega Retro Average 
Publication Score Source
{{{{{icon}}}|L}} Division by zero.
Based on
0 review
Sega Retro Average 
Publication Version Score
1700 igr dlya Sega (RU)
50
[8]
Electronic Games (1992-1995) (US) NTSC-U
100
[9]
Electronic Gaming Monthly (US) NTSC-U
72
[10]
Game Players (US) NTSC-U
90
[3]
GamePro (US) NTSC-U
95
[11]
Sega Pro (UK) NTSC-U
80
[12]
Tricks 16 bit (RU)
78
[13]
VideoGames (US) NTSC-U
100
[14]
Sega Mega Drive
83
Based on
8 reviews

World Series Baseball (Mega Drive)

Mega Drive, US
WSB MD US Box.jpg
Cover
WSB MD US Cart.jpg
Cart
World Series Baseball MD US Manual.pdf
Manual
WSB MD US pcb.jpg
PCB
Mega Drive, BR
WSB MD BR Box.jpg
Cover

Technical information

ROM dump status

System Hash Size Build Date Source Comments
Sega Mega Drive
 ?
CRC32
MD5
SHA-1
1994-05-27 Page
Sega Mega Drive
 ?
CRC32
MD5
SHA-1
1994-03-04 Page
Sega Mega Drive
 ?
CRC32
MD5
SHA-1
1994-02-18 Page
Sega Mega Drive
 ?
CRC32
MD5
SHA-1
1994-01-16 Page
Sega Mega Drive
 ?
CRC32
MD5
SHA-1
1994-01-06 Page
Sega Mega Drive
 ?
CRC32
MD5
SHA-1
1994-01-03 Page
Sega Mega Drive
 ?
CRC32
MD5
SHA-1
1993-12-29 Page
Sega Mega Drive
 ?
CRC32
MD5
SHA-1
1993-12-26 Page
Sega Mega Drive
 ?
CRC32
MD5
SHA-1
1993-12-22 Page
Sega Mega Drive
 ?
CRC32
MD5
SHA-1
1993-10-01 Page

References


World Series Baseball (Mega Drive)

WorldSeriesBaseball MD title.png

Main page | Magazine articles | Reception | Region coding


Sega Mega Drive
Prototypes: 1993-10-01 | 12-22 | 12-26 | 12-29 | 1994-01-03 | 01-06 | 01-16 | 02-18 | 03-04 | 05-27



Games in the World Series Baseball Series
Sega Mega Drive
World Series Baseball (1994) | World Series Baseball '95 (1995) | World Series Baseball '96 (1996) | World Series Baseball 98 (1997)
Sega Game Gear
World Series Baseball (1993) | World Series Baseball '95 (1994) | Nomo's World Series Baseball (1995)
Sega 32X
World Series Baseball Starring Deion Sanders (1995)
Sega Saturn
World Series Baseball (1995) | World Series Baseball II (1996) | World Series Baseball 98 (1997)
Windows PC
World Series Baseball '96 (1996)
Arcade
World Series 99 (1999) | World Series Baseball (2001)
Sega Dreamcast
World Series Baseball 2K1 (2000) | World Series Baseball 2K2 (2001)
Xbox
World Series Baseball (2002) | World Series Baseball 2K3 (2003)
World Series Baseball related media
Book
Prima's Official Strategy Guide: World Series Baseball 2K1 (2000)