Pulseman

From Sega Retro

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Pulseman Title.png

Pulseman
System(s): Sega Mega Drive, Virtual Console
Publisher: Sega
Developer:
Sound driver: SMPS 68000 (modified)
Genre: Action[1][2]

















Number of players: 1
Release Date RRP Code
Sega Mega Drive
JP
¥7,8007,800 G-4098
Wii Virtual Console
JP
600pts600[7]
CERO: A
Wii Virtual Console
US
900pts900[3]
ESRB: Everyone
Wii Virtual Console
EU
900pts900[4]
Wii Virtual Console
AU
900pts900[8]
OFLC: G

Pulseman (パルスマン) is a Sega Mega Drive action platform game developed by Game Freak and published by Sega. Originally seeing a Japanese-exclusive release in July 1994, it was later brought to North America on Sega Channel in 1995, and eventually released worldwide on Nintendo Virtual Console in April 2007. Though the text of the game is in Japanese, the voice acting is in English.

Story

In 1999, the young scientist and computer engineer Doc Yoshiyama creates a "C-Life," an advanced artificial intelligence, named Amabilis. He fell in love with the C-Life girl he created and digitized and uploaded himself into the computer core to be with her. By combining his DNA and her program core, he created the half-human, half-C-Life boy named Pulseman. Because of his hybrid nature, Pulseman can freely travel between the real world and cyberspace. He also has the power to channel electricity through his body.

In 2015, the evil Doc Waruyama uses a system called EUREKA, which allows for C-Life beings to manifest in the human world, to establish the Galaxy Gang and use it to spread a new wave of cyber-terrorism across the world. Pulseman must put an end to this gang for the sake of the free world. Pulseman is assisted by his girlfriend Beatrice, a C-Life girl who used to be a member of the Galaxy Gang. Beatrice provides Pulseman with information about stages and items and warns him when his health is low.

The English Wii Shop description for the game states that Doc Yoshiyama becomes Doc Waruyama after living in the computer world for too long and becoming twisted and evil.

Gameplay

Pulseman, Stage Select.png

Stage select

The game is a platformer. Pulseman moves with Left and Right and ducks with Down. His walk turns into a run after a short distance. He can perform a Lightning Dash with LeftLeft or RightRight, which allows Pulseman to dash a short distance through enemies or over hazards. The Lightning Dash does not harm enemies or move through walls. He jumps with C. He can perform a somersault with Up+B or Up+C that damages enemies. He does a short-ranged attack with B (or a kick with Down+B). He does a short jump (if not already in the air) and becomes briefly charged with energy with A, which can be used to attack enemies or jump onto wires. Pulseman turns into an energy ball when he jumps onto a wire. The player can use the D-pad to switch onto another nearby wire or press A, B, or C to jump off the wire.

Pulseman can enter a Sparkling State, in which he becomes imbued with electricity, by running, using the Lightning Dash, or collecting the Voltecc Energy item. While in the Sparkling State, his offensive abilities are upgraded. His basic attack becomes the Slash Arrow, a horizontal projectile, with B. The Slash Arrow can penetrate multiple enemies. He can also perform the Voltteccer with A, where Pulseman turns into a ball of energy and launches at a 45-degree upward angle in the direction that he is facing. He bounces off walls, floors, ceilings, and the sides of the screen while in this state. He is invincible while in this state and damages any enemies that he collides with, though there are some enemies that can take him out of this state. The Voltteccer allows Pulseman to access areas that are normally inaccessible since it reaches higher than his jump, can break through certain blocks, can bounce off spikes, and can fit through narrow spaces. The state normally lasts a short time, but bouncing off surfaces extends its duration. Pulseman can stay in this state indefinitely if caught between surfaces, but he can exit the state manually with A, B, or C. The Slash Arrow and Voltteccer can both be done in the air after jumping. Pulseman loses the Sparkling State after using the Slash Arrow or Voltteccer, unless he has the Voltecc Energy item.

Pulseman cannot use his abilities in water, though he can still hit enemies at melee range with B. Water dissipates his projectiles and interrupts his Voltteccer and Sparkling State.

Pulseman's health is indicated by the color of the circle in the top-left corner of the screen. It is blue at full health but then turns yellow and finally red as he takes damage from enemies or hazards. If he takes additional damage while it is red, he loses a life.

Items

Pulseman, Items.png
Spark Ball
Collect 10 to earn an extra life.
Pulseman, Items.png
Life Up
Restores Pulseman's health by one color.
Pulseman, Items.png
1 Up
Gives the player an extra life.
Pulseman, Items.png
Voltecc Energy
Keeps Pulseman in the Sparkling State until he exits the current area or loses a life, allowing him to use the Slash Arrow and Voltteccer repeatedly.

Stages

The first three stages can be played in any order. After they have been completed, the next three stages open up and can also be played in any order. After all six stages have been completed, the final stage is played.

Pulseman, Stage 1-1.png

Pulseman, Stage 1-2.png

Pulseman, Stage 1-3.png

Pulseman, Stage 1 Boss.png

  • Pulseman, Stage 1-1.png

  • Pulseman, Stage 1-2.png

  • Pulseman, Stage 1-3.png

  • Pulseman, Stage 1 Boss.png

Tokyo City

Pulseman, Stage 2-1.png

Pulseman, Stage 2-2.png

Pulseman, Stage 2-3.png

Pulseman, Stage 2 Boss.png

  • Pulseman, Stage 2-1.png

  • Pulseman, Stage 2-2.png

  • Pulseman, Stage 2-3.png

  • Pulseman, Stage 2 Boss.png

Indian Forest

Pulseman, Stage 3-1.png

Pulseman, Stage 3-2.png

Pulseman, Stage 3-3.png

Pulseman, Stage 3 Boss.png

  • Pulseman, Stage 3-1.png

  • Pulseman, Stage 3-2.png

  • Pulseman, Stage 3-3.png

  • Pulseman, Stage 3 Boss.png

Las Vegas

Pulseman, Stage 4-1.png

Pulseman, Stage 4-2.png

Pulseman, Stage 4-3.png

Pulseman, Stage 4 Boss.png

  • Pulseman, Stage 4-1.png

  • Pulseman, Stage 4-2.png

  • Pulseman, Stage 4-3.png

  • Pulseman, Stage 4 Boss.png

Mechanical Ruins

Pulseman, Stage 5-1.png

Pulseman, Stage 5-2.png

Pulseman, Stage 5-3.png

Pulseman, Stage 5 Boss.png

  • Pulseman, Stage 5-1.png

  • Pulseman, Stage 5-2.png

  • Pulseman, Stage 5-3.png

  • Pulseman, Stage 5 Boss.png

Alaska Range

Pulseman, Stage 6-1.png

Pulseman, Stage 6-2.png

Pulseman, Stage 6-3.png

Pulseman, Stage 6 Boss.png

  • Pulseman, Stage 6-1.png

  • Pulseman, Stage 6-2.png

  • Pulseman, Stage 6-3.png

  • Pulseman, Stage 6 Boss.png

Coral Sea

Pulseman, Stage 7-1.png

Pulseman, Stage 7-2.png

Pulseman, Stage 7-3.png

Pulseman, Stage 7 Boss.png

  • Pulseman, Stage 7-1.png

  • Pulseman, Stage 7-2.png

  • Pulseman, Stage 7-3.png

  • Pulseman, Stage 7 Boss.png

Techno Park 1

Pulseman, Stage 8-1.png

Pulseman, Stage 8-2.png

Pulseman, Stage 8-3.png

Pulseman, Stage 8 Boss.png

  • Pulseman, Stage 8-1.png

  • Pulseman, Stage 8-2.png

  • Pulseman, Stage 8-3.png

  • Pulseman, Stage 8 Boss.png

Techno Park 2

Bonus Stage

Pulseman, Bonus Stage.png

Bonus stage

In between stages, Pulseman plays a bonus stage where he uses his Voltteccer ability to try to break all the blocks before time runs out, similar to Breakout and Arkanoid. The player can move the paddle with Left and Right while Pulseman is in his energy ball form, which catches Pulseman and allows him to launch his Voltteccer again.

History

Development

In development, the game was originally known as Spark (スパーク).

Many of Pulseman's staff, including director Ken Sugimori and composer Junichi Masuda, would go on to produce the world-renowned Pokémon series.

Legacy

In February 2007, fan translation group M.I.J.E.T. released an English translation of the game.[9]

Production credits

  • Direction & Game Design: Ken Sugimori, Satoshi Tajiri
  • Program: Junichi Masuda, Takenori Ohta, Michiharu Nisihasi, Tomomichi Ohta
  • Graphics: Ken Sugimori, Motofumi Fujiwara, Atsuko Nisida
  • Music & Sound Effects: Junichi Masuda
  • Story Plot: Ryosuke Taniguchi
  • Special Thanks: Akihito Tomisawa, Hiroshi Kawamoto, Naoko Kawakami, Kenji Matsusima, Dai Sato, Gento Matsumoto, Fumihiro Nonomura

© 1994 Sega/Game Freak

Source:
In-game credits[10]

Magazine articles

Main article: Pulseman/Magazine articles.

Promotional material

Logo-pdf.svg
Print advert in Beep! MegaDrive (JP) #1994-07: "July 1994" (1994-06-08)
Logo-pdf.svg
Print advert in Beep! MegaDrive (JP) #1994-08: "August 1994" (1994-07-08)

Physical scans

Sega Retro Average 
Publication Score Source
{{{{{icon}}}|L}} Division by zero.
Based on
0 review
Sega Retro Average 
Publication Version Score
1700 igr dlya Sega (RU)
50
[11]
Beep! MegaDrive (JP) NTSC-J
65
[12]
Famitsu (JP) NTSC-J
60
[13]
Mega (UK) NTSC-J
68
[14]
Mega Fun (DE) NTSC-J
69
[15]
Sega Pro (UK) NTSC-J
81
[16]
Sega Saturn Magazine (JP) NTSC-J
77
[17]
Tricks 16 bit (RU)
81
[18]
Sega Mega Drive
69
Based on
8 reviews

Pulseman

Mega Drive, JP
Pulseman MD JP Box.jpg
Cover
Pulseman MD JP CartTop.jpg
Pulseman MD JP Cart.jpg
Cart
Pulseman md jp manual.pdf
Manual

Technical information

ROM dump status

System Hash Size Build Date Source Comments
Sega Mega Drive
CRC32 138a104e
MD5 b0952bec44386411651ad944c67cf86c
SHA-1 5fd76a5f80e4684b5f9d445ddb893679985684e6
2MB 1994-05 Cartridge (JP)

External links

References


Pulseman

Pulseman Title.png

Main page | Maps | Hidden content | Development | Magazine articles | Reception | Region coding | Technical information


Music: Pulseman e.p. (1994) | Pulseman (1994) | Electrace Pulseman (1994)

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