Difference between revisions of "Non-Sega consoles"

From Sega Retro

(it looks a bit awkward but whatever)
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[[File:Crazytaxi ps2 us disc.jpg|thumb|right|Following the end of the Dreamcast, ''[[Crazy Taxi]]'', a once-Sega exclusive, was ported to both the [[PlayStation 2]] and [[GameCube]]. It was very well received by critics.]]
 
[[File:Crazytaxi ps2 us disc.jpg|thumb|right|Following the end of the Dreamcast, ''[[Crazy Taxi]]'', a once-Sega exclusive, was ported to both the [[PlayStation 2]] and [[GameCube]]. It was very well received by critics.]]
 
Throughout its existence, Sega has supported video game consoles of all shapes and sizes, not just those it created. Though for the best part of twenty years, Sega were more concerned with their own systems, the company has repeatedly branched out to support its competitors, and, following the demise of the [[Sega Dreamcast]], it has ''only'' supported non-Sega systems.
 
Throughout its existence, Sega has supported video game consoles of all shapes and sizes, not just those it created. Though for the best part of twenty years, Sega were more concerned with their own systems, the company has repeatedly branched out to support its competitors, and, following the demise of the [[Sega Dreamcast]], it has ''only'' supported non-Sega systems.
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[[Category:Home consoles]]
 
[[Category:Home consoles]]

Revision as of 15:19, 31 March 2013

Following the end of the Dreamcast, Crazy Taxi, a once-Sega exclusive, was ported to both the PlayStation 2 and GameCube. It was very well received by critics.

Throughout its existence, Sega has supported video game consoles of all shapes and sizes, not just those it created. Though for the best part of twenty years, Sega were more concerned with their own systems, the company has repeatedly branched out to support its competitors, and, following the demise of the Sega Dreamcast, it has only supported non-Sega systems.