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Night Trap

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Night Trap
System(s): Sega Mega-CD, Sega Mega-CD 32X
Publisher:
Sega Mega-CD
Sega
Sega Mega-CD
Digital Pictures (US, re-release)
Sega Mega-CD 32X
Digital Pictures
Developer:
Distributor:
Sega Mega-CD
Acclaim (US, re-release)
Sega Mega-CD 32X
Acclaim
Genre: Adventure































Number of players: 1
Official in-game languages:
Sega Mega-CD
  • English
  • 日本語
  • Français
  • Sega Mega-CD 32X
  • English
  • Release Date RRP Code
    Sega Mega-CD
    JP
    ¥8,800 G-6025
    Sega Mega-CD
    US
    $49.99[1] 4903
    Sega Mega-CD
    US
    (MA-17 Rerelease)
    $? 4903
    Sega Mega-CD
    US
    (Rerelease)
    $? T-162105
    Sega Mega-CD
    UK
    £49.99[5][6] 4903
    Sega Mega-CD
    FR
    ?F 4903-09
    Sega Mega-CD
    PT
    ? ?
    Sega Mega-CD
    BR
    R$? 063000



    Sega Mega-CD 32X
    US
    1995-01[4] $? T-16202F
    Sega Mega-CD 32X
    EU
    1995 £? T-16202F-50

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    Night Trap (ナイトトラップ) is a full motion video game developed by Digital Pictures for the Mega-CD. It was originally released by Sega as a launch title for the system in the U.S.

    Gameplay

    The player takes the role of an agent ("control") who is tasked by Lt. Simms of SCAT (short for either "Sega Control Attack Team" or "Special Control Attack Team") to watch over four teenage girls (Lisa, Ashley, Cindy, and Megan), one boy (Danny), and an undercover agent (Kelli (Keli Medd in the manual)) visiting a house which is infested with vampiric creatures known as "Augers". The house is owned by a married vampire couple consisting of Victor and Sheila Martin, and its residents include their two children, Jeff and Sarah, and a cousin, Tony.

    The player can see what goes on around the house through different cameras that are placed in eight locations: the entryway, living room, kitchen, bedroom, bathroom, driveway, and two hallways. The player can use the D-pad to select an area and press A on the selected area to view it. The cameras show what happens in these areas via full motion videos and the times these videos play follow a rigid script. There is also a map showing how the rooms are connected, a timer showing how much time has passed in-game, a counter showing how many Augers can be captured ("Possible") and a counter showing how many Augers have been captured ("Captured"). The player can access the map by pressing Select.

    The player can capture the Augers and any other enemy by watching the room the enemy is in, waiting for the enemy to come in range of one of the room's traps (indicated by a sensor bar), and pressing B to activate the trap. The traps are protected with an access code that is always set to blue at the beginning of the game. The code will change to a random color (blue, red, green, orange, purple, or yellow) at four different points during a game, and the player must listen in on certain conversations to learn what the code has been changed to. The player can change their code to match what the code has been changed to by pressing C.

    There are 95 Augers in total to capture; the player must capture at least 60 to be able to reach the end of the game. To get a perfect ending, the player must capture all 95 Augers, all of the Martins, and Tony. Getting disconnected from SCAT or losing control of the cameras and traps to the Martins will result in a game over. SCAT will disconnect the player if any of the following happens:

    1. The timer reaches 08:47 and the "captured" counter has a number less than 10.
    2. An Auger going after Lisa is not trapped in time.
    3. The timer reaches 13:42 and the "captured" counter has a number less than 29.
    4. An Auger going after Ashley is not trapped in time.
    5. An Auger going after Megan is not trapped in time.
    6. The player activates a trap resulting in Megan's death.
    7. The timer reaches 20:08 and the "captured" counter has a number less than 60.

    The Martins will regain control of the cameras and traps if any of the following happens:

    1. Tony is not trapped before he can get to Kelli and take her into the basement.
    2. Jeff stops Cindy from being hounded by Augers before the player can trap a specific Auger and bites Cindy.

    Five different endings can be reached if at least 60 Augers are captured, four of the girls (Lisa, Ashley, Cindy, and Megan) are saved from Augers, and Kelli is saved from Tony:

    1. Bad ending: Kelli is bitten by Sarah. This ending will play out if the player fails to capture Sarah in time.
    2. Bad ending: Kelli is bitten by Victor. This ending will play out if the player successfully captures Sarah, but fails to capture Victor in time.
    3. Bad ending: Kelli is bitten by Shelia. This ending will play out if the player successfully captures Sarah, but fails to capture Shelia in time.
    4. "Very Good" ending: Kelli thanks the player for saving her and says the player was "very good" since the player saved her friends but only captured "most" of the Augers. She then says that with "a little practice" the player can be "perfect". An Auger will rise from behind her as she exits the scene. This ending will play out if the player successfully captures Sarah, Victor, and Shelia, but only captures 60-94 Augers.
    5. Perfect ending: Kelli says that the player was "perfect" and thanks the player. Kelli walks near a trap as she exits the scene. This ending will play out if the player successfully captures all 95 Augers and captures Sarah, Victor, and Shelia.

    Despite the game ending after 25 minutes and 40 seconds, it contains more than 90 minutes of footage exists across the two CD-ROMs.

    History

    Development

    Night Trap was initially produced for the Control-Vision (codenamed NEMO), an unreleased console by Hasbro which relied on VHS tapes instead of ROM cartridges. A prototype game titled Scene of the Crime was produced to demonstrate the surveillance camera gameplay that would later be a core part of Night Trap. Hasbro abandoned the console fearing its high retail price, and sold the rights to the game to Digital Pictures, which set about producing a Mega-CD version. Despite the sale, Hasbro still owned the Night Trap trademark.[10] The footage was originally recorded during a three-week period in 1987 in Culver City, California. The game reportedly cost $1.5 million to produce.

    When development of Night Trap moved to the Mega-CD, Digital Pictures shot an introduction scene and five game over scenes that referenced Sega and the controller used with the Mega-CD. These sequences would only be used with the Night Trap versions that were published by Sega.

    As with Sewer Shark and later Prize Fighter, Night Trap uses a system in which four video streams are streamed off a disc at any one time, allowing for transitions between choices without the need for intrusive disc access times. This is achieved through a proprietary video codec developed by Digital Pictures, although a side effect is noticeably low resolution footage (in addition to the already present colour loss).

    Footage of Tom Zito demonstrating early Scene of the Crime footage to Hasbro executives in December 1986 was included as a hidden bonus in the Mega-CD version of the game.

    Release

    Night Trap stands as one of the most controversial video games of all time, with its existence, alongside Mortal Kombat, Doom and Lethal Enforcers, eventually leading to the creation of the Entertainment Software Rating Board (ESRB) in North America to regulate video games for the general public.

    However, while the aforementioned games earned their status through their presentation of graphic violence (and in Lethal Enforcers's case, shipping with a physical gun), Night Trap lacks violent content, with Augers simply being pushed or dropped into holes in the walls or floors of the house. In many cases, blood is not extracted by biting as is common with vampires, but is instead extracted with a machine, designed specifically to look unrealistic and mitigate possible controversy.

    Likewise it was misconstrued for having sexual content, as in many scenes partially dressed girls are chased by Augers around the house. However, no nudity of any kind is shown at any point. Lisa's death, which occurs in a bathroom while wearing a nightgown is an often cited scene, but like all deaths in Night Trap, features no physical violence or nudity, just the screaming girl being led out of the room. Likewise the player is not directly responsible for any deaths, though can choose to drop Kelly down a hole at the end of the game.

    Night Trap was the first game to be given an MA-17 rating by Sega's Videogame Rating Council[11], although it is not thought any versions of the game were explicitly labeled as such. Some retailers chose to add their own notices for "violent" content, or indeed not stock the game at all due to the controversy.

    Due to the problems Night Trap and violent video game content was causing in the US, Sega of America stopped distributing the version of the game they published in January 1994.[12] A Mega-CD version published by Digital Pictures itself and distributed by Acclaim was released in 1995. It had an ESRB "M" rating, new cover art, and no Sega-related references in-game.

    Press coverage of Night Trap is said to have led to a greater interest in the game than was otherwise expected, leading to increased sales and numerous other FMV games being released for the next few years.

    To mitigate controversy in the UK, Sega voluntarily referred Night Trap to the British Board of Film Classification[13], becoming the first video game to be rated by the body[14]. Despite expectations that it would be rating 18, it received a 15 certificate[13], with the BBFC's James Ferman claiming it was "more like an old episode of Doctor Who"[14].

    This did not stop complaints, such as mother of three Jacqueline Nicholls organising a protest after her 9, 11 and 12-year old children witnessed scenes of the game on a shopping trip[15]. Her local MP Tony Marlow subsequently wrote to the Home Secretary and Trading Standards[15], although no further action is believed to have been taken.

    The game was completely banned from sale in Germany[16].

    Legacy

    Despite the controversy caused by its existence, sales of Night Trap were strong enough for Digital Pictures to port the game to other systems, such as the 3DO, DOS, and Macintosh computers. It was also released as one of six Mega-CD 32X games.

    Hasbro's Night Trap trademark expired on January 5, 2002.[10]

    A ground-up remake of Night Trap with restored film footage was developed by Screaming Villains, but it did not contain the SCAT scenes used in the Mega-CD version published by Sega. Screaming Villains has stated that their exclusion was due to Sega owning those specific scenes.[17]

    Production credits

    Mega-CD version

    North American version

    • Cast:
      • Kelly: Dana Plato
      • Cindy: Tracy Matheson
      • Lisa: Debra Parks
      • Ashley: Alison Rhea
      • Megan: Christy Ford
      • Danny: Josh Goddard
      • Victor Martin: Jon R. Kamal
      • Sheila Martin: Molly Starr
      • Sarah Martin: Suzy Cote
      • Jeff Martin: Andras Jones
      • Tony: Giovanni Lemm
      • Eddie: William Bertrand
    • SCAT Team:
      • Lt. Simms: J. Bill Jones
      • Collins: Arthur Burghardt
      • Swanson: Heidi Von Brecht
      • Jason: Deke Anderson
      • Mike: Blake Gibbons
      • Jim: Roy Eisenstein
    • Line Producer: Donald Klune
    • Associate Producer: Jerrum Schwarz
    • Director of Photography: Don Burgess
    • First Assistant Camera: Josh Bleibtreu
    • Second Assistant Camera: Jackie Compton
    • Gaffer: Tom Termeer
    • Stunt Coordinator: Brad Bovee
    • Stunts: Annie Allman, Christine Baur, Bobby Burns, Robin Cook, Danny Costa, Charles Croughwell, Patricia Gleason, Karisa Plehn, David Rowden, Michelle St. Germaine, Ben Scott, John Clay-Scott, Dane Selznick, Lincoln Simonds, Greg Smrz
    • Best Boy: Philip Tuck
    • Electricians: Dante Cordone, John Maninger
    • Key Grip: Jamie Young
    • Best Boy Grip: Tony Noko
    • Grip: Jim Moriarty
    • Script Supervisors: Nancy Friedman, Kathy Lubinsky
    • Sound Mixer: Jim Tanenbaum
    • Boom Operator: Ken Beauchene
    • Costume Design: Dona Granata
    • Costumer: Susan Kaufmann
    • Makeup/Hair: Annie Mayo, Bob Smith
    • Production Designer: Roger Collins
    • Art Director: Mike Caldwell
    • Standby Labor: Jesse Williams
    • Property Master: Guy Bushman
    • Transportation Captain: Dale Dodds
    • Production Coordinator: Shiela Warner
    • Production Assistants: Laura Namerow, Caylah Eddleblute
    • Craft Services: David Cranney
    • Still Photographer: Ed Fortson
    • Production Accountants: Donna Williams, Anne Flautt Read
    • Montage Editors: Warren Nelson, Steve Tomich, Rob Anderson
    • Online Editor: Miodrag Certic
    • Assistant Editors: Ron Atik, Jeff Belton, John Gula, Rusty Colby, Bart Giovanetti
    • Paintbox/Harry Designer: Scott Williams
    • Film to Tape Colorists: Jim Barret, Bob Campbell
    • Assistant Colorists: Dan McNamara, Jeff Berman
    • Rerecording Engineer: Larry Forkner
    • Prelay: T.C.
    • Music Composed by: Sunny BlueSkyes, Martin Lund
    • Sound Effects: Warren Dewey
    Additional Footage
    • Director: Randy Field
    • Line Producer: Jane Hernandez
    • Writer: Barry Oringer
    • Director of Photography: Rick Wise
    • Assistant Camera: Rod Williams
    • Set Design: Josh Koral
    • Gaffer: Peter Thomas
    • Key Grip: Jani Vournas
    • Grips: Chris Thomas, Mark Kohr
    • Sound: Bob Gravenor
    • Editor: Bob Johns
    • Makup/Wardrobe: Nancie Marsalis
    • Makeup Artist: Nellie Muganda
    • Video: George Rosenfeld
    • Production Coordinator: Mandy Landa
    • Production Assistants: Tori Asness, Tiffany Kinney
    • Craft Services: Matt Cheese
    • Original Programming: Mark Voorsanger, David Crane
    • Additional Programming: Kenneth Soohoo
    • Tester: Neil Hickey
    • Production Assistant: Dena Maheras
    • V.P. Engineering: Mark Klein
    • Chairman of the Board: Martin Erlichman
    • Legal Counsel:
      • Business Affairs: Barry Tyerman, Armstrong & Hirsch
      • Intellectual Property: David Hayes, Fenwick & West
    • Title Sequence and Credits: Joshua Solomon
    • Director, Computer Graphics: Lode Coen
    The events and characters depicted in this photoplay are fictitious. Any similarity to actual persons living, dead, or undead, is purely coincidental.
    Ownership of this interactive U-Direct™ motion picture is protected by copyright, trademark, patent, and other applicable laws. Any unauthorized duplication, distribution, or exhibition of this interactive U-Direct™ motion picture could result in criminal prosecution as well as civil liability.
    Night Trap™ is a trademark of Hasbro, Inc.
    U-Direct is a trademark of Digital Pictures, Inc.
    Portions © 1992 Sega
    © 1992 Digital Pictures, Inc. All Rights Reserved.
    Source: In-game credits
    A Digital Pictures Production
    A U-Direct® Interactive Film
    • Executive Producer: Tom Zito
    • Original Concept: Rob Fulop, James Riley
    • Interactive Design: James Riley, Rob Fulop
    • Screenplay: Terry McDonell
    • Computer Programming: Gene Kusmiak
    • Produced by: Ric LaCivita, Kevin Welsh
    • Directed by: James Riley
    • Lead Tester: David Popovich
    Source: US manual (re-release)[18]

    Japanese version

    • Voices of Characters:
      • Kelly: Kikuko Inoue
      • Cindy: Makoto Tsumura
      • Lisa: Atsuko Tanaka
      • Ashley: Naoko Usagawa
      • Megan: Akemi Okamura
      • Danny: Akira Ishida
      • Victor Martin: Rokuroh Naya
      • Sheila Martin: Kazuko Yanaga
      • Sarah Martin: Fumiko Taneda
      • Jeff Martin: Mitsuaki Madono
      • Tony: Tomohiro Tsuboi
      • Eddie: Mitsuru Ogata
    • SCAT Team:
      • Lt. Simms: Akio Ohtsuka
      • Collins: Yosuke Akimoto
      • Mike: Hideaki Ono
      • Swanson: Naomi Watanabe
      • Jason: Eiji Sekiguchi
    • Voice Actors: Actresses Cooperation, EZAKI Production
    • Sound Editing Staff
      • Script Translator: Eiko Kamiya
      • Editing Director: Koji Momose
      • Sound Mixer: Hideyasu Iizuka
      • ADR Supervisor: Takayuki Shibazaki
      • Asst. Sound Editor: Mamoru Togashi
      • DAT Operator: Shigeo Kaneshiro
      • Product Manager: Keisuke Yoshida
      • Product Coordinator: Hiroo Inui
    • All Sound Recorded at: GLOVISION, Inc.
    Source: In-game credits

    Mega-CD 32X version

    • Cast:
      • Kelly: Dana Plato
      • Cindy: Tracy Matheson
      • Lisa: Debra Parks
      • Ashley: Alison Rhea
      • Megan: Christy Ford
      • Danny: Josh Goddard
      • Victor Martin: Jon R. Kamal
      • Sheila Martin: Molly Starr
      • Sarah Martin: Suzy Cote
      • Jeff Martin: Andras Jones
      • Tony: Giovanni Lemm
      • Eddie: William Bertrand
    • SCAT Team:
      • Lt. Simms: J. Bill Jones
      • Collins: Arthur Burghardt
      • Swanson: Heidi Von Brecht
      • Jason: Deke Anderson
      • Mike: Blake Gibbons
      • Jim: Roy Eisenstein
    • Line Producer: Donald Klune
    • Associate Producer: Jerrum Schwarz
    • First Assistant Camera: Josh Bleibtreu
    • Second Assistant Camera: Jackie Compton
    • Gaffer: Tom Termeer
    • Stunt Coordinator: Brad Bovee
    • Stunts: Annie Allman, Christine Baur, Bobby Burns, Robin Cook, Danny Costa, Charles Croughwell, Patricia Gleason, Karisa Plehn, David Rowden, Michelle St. Germaine, Ben Scott, John Clay-Scott, Dane Selznick, Lincoln Simonds, Greg Smrz
    • Best Boy: Philip Tuck
    • Electricians: Dante Cordone, John Maninger
    • Key Grip: Jamie Young
    • Best Boy Grip: Tony Noko
    • Grip: Jim Moriarty
    • Script Supervisors: Nancy Friedman, Kathy Lubinsky
    • Sound Mixer: Jim Tanenbaum
    • Boom Operator: Ken Beauchene
    • Costume Design: Dona Granata
    • Costumer: Susan Kaufmann
    • Makeup/Hair: Annie Mayo, Bob Smith
    • Production Designer: Roger Collins
    • Art Director: Mike Caldwell
    • Standby Labor: Jesse Williams
    • Property Master: Guy Bushman
    • Transportation Captain: Dale Dodds
    • Production Coordinator: Shiela Warner
    • Production Assistants: Laura Namerow, Caylah Eddleblute
    • Craft Services: David Cranney
    • Still Photographer: Ed Fortson
    • Production Accountants: Donna Williams, Anne Flautt Read
    • Montage Editors: Warren Nelson, Steve Tomich, Rob Anderson
    • Online Editor: Miodrag Certic
    • Assistant Editors: Ron Atik, Jeff Belton, John Gula, Rusty Colby, Bart Giovanetti
    • Paintbox/Harry Designer: Scott Williams
    • Film to Tape Colorists: Jim Barret, Bob Campbell
    • Assistant Colorists: Dan McNamara, Jeff Berman
    • Rerecording Engineer: Larry Forkner
    • Prelay: T.C.
    • Music Composed by: Sunny BlueSkyes, Martin Lund
    • Sound Effects: Warren Dewey
    • Associate Producer: Ryan Sinnock
    • Original Programming: Mark Voorsanger, David Crane
    • Head Tester: David Popovich
    • Computer Graphics: Dale Barcellos, Joshua Solomon
    • Director, Computer Graphics: Lode Coen
    The events and characters depicted in this photoplay are fictitious. Any similarity to actual persons living, dead, or undead, is purely coincidental.
    Ownership of this interactive U-Direct motion picture is protected by copyright, trademark, patent, and other applicable laws. Any unauthorized duplication, distribution, or exhibition of this interactive U-Direct motion picture could result in criminal prosecution as well as civil liability.
    Night Trap uses Digital Pictures' patent pending InstaSwitch technology. Digital video captured using Digital Pictures' DigiChrome process.
    Night Trap is a trademark of Hasbro, Inc.
    U-Direct and DigiChrome are registered trademarks of Digital Pictures, Inc.
    InstaSwitch is a trademark of Digital Pictures, Inc.
    © 1994 Digital Pictures, Inc. All Rights Reserved.
    Source: In-game credits
    A Digital Pictures Production
    A U-Direct® Interactive Film
    • Executive Producer: Tom Zito
    • Original Concept: Rob Fulop, James Riley
    • Interactive Design: James Riley, Rob Fulop
    • Director of Photography: Don Burgess
    • Screenplay: Terry McDonell
    • Computer Programming: Gene Kusmiak
    • Produced by: Ric LaCivita, Kevin Welsh
    • Directed by: James Riley
    • Computer Graphics: Lode Coen, Cuyler Gee
    Source: US manual[19]

    Magazine articles

    Main article: Night Trap/Magazine articles.

    Promotional material

    Main article: Night Trap/Promotional material.

    Physical scans

    Mega-CD version

    Sega Retro Average 
    Publication Score Source
    70 [20]
    83 [21]
    90 [22]
    71 [23]
    60 [24]
    78 [25]
    83 №258, p39
    69 [26]
    95 [27]
    85 [28]
    95 №1994-01, p38
    89 [29]
    82 №10, p52-55
    85 №7, p40-41
    84 №28, p66-69
    79 №17, p72-75
    89 [30]
    86 [31]
    84 №44, p54-55
    80 [32]
    87 №19, p28-29
    58 №8, p30-31
    74 [33]
    84 [34]
    75 №2, p12
    72 [35]
    Sega Mega-CD
    80
    Based on
    26 reviews

    Mega-CD, US
    NightTrap MCD US Box Back.jpgNightTrap MCD US Box Front.jpg
    Cover
    Nighttrap mcd us disc1.jpg
    Disc 1
    Nighttrap mcd us disc2.jpg
    Disc 2
    Nighttrap mcd us manual.pdf
    Manual
    Mega-CD, US (re-release)
    Nighttrap mcd us rerelease backcover.jpgNighttrap mcd us rerelease frontcover.jpg
    Cover
    Nighttrap mcd us rerelease disc1.jpg
    Disc 1
    Nighttrap mcd us rerelease disc2.jpg
    Disc 2
    Nighttrap mcd us rerelease manual.pdf
    Manual
    Mega-CD, EU
    NightTrap MCD EU Box Back.jpgNightTrap MCD EU Box Front.jpg
    Cover
    NightTrap MCD EU spinecard.jpg
    Spinecard
    NightTrap MCD EU Disc1.jpg
    Disc 1
    NightTrap MCD EU Disc2.jpg
    Disc 2
    Mega-CD, FR
    Nighttrap mcd fr backcover.jpgNighttrap mcd fr frontcover.jpg
    Cover
    NightTrap MCD FR Disc1.jpg
    Disc 1
    NightTrap MCD FR Disc2.jpg
    Disc 2
    Mega-CD, JP
    NightTrap MCD JP Box Back.jpgNightTrap MCD JP Box Front.jpg
    Cover
    NightTrap MCD JP spinecard.jpg
    Spinecard
    NightTrap MCD JP Disc1.jpg
    Disc 1
    NightTrap MCD JP Disc2.jpg
    Disc 2
    Mega-CD, BR
    NightTrap MCD BR Box Back.jpgNospine.pngNightTrap MCD BR Box Front.jpg
    Cover
    Mega-CD, PT

    Mega-CD 32X version

    Sega Retro Average 
    Publication Score Source
    {{{{{icon}}}|L}} Division by zero.
    Based on
    0 review

    <meta itemprop="ratingValue" content="Division by zero.">

    Sega Retro Average 
    Publication Version Score
    (FR) PAL
    84
    [36]
    (US) NTSC-U
    85
    [37]
    (US) NTSC-U
    58
    [38]
    (FR) PAL
    85
    [39]
    (US) NTSC-U
    0
    [40]
    (FR) PAL
    80
    [41]
    (UK) PAL
    80
    [42]
    (AU) PAL
    59
    [43]
    (US) NTSC-U
    70
    [44]
    Sega Mega-CD 32X
    67
    Based on
    9 reviews
    Mega-CD 32X, US
    NightTrap MCD32X US Box Front.jpg
    Cover
    Nighttrap 32x us disc1.jpg
    Disc 1
    Nighttrap 32x us disc2.jpg
    Disc 2
    Nighttrap mcd32x us manual.pdf
    Manual
    Mega-CD 32X, EU
    NightTrap MCD32X EU Box Back.jpgNightTrap MCD32X EU Box Front.jpg
    Cover

    Technical information

    ROM dump status

    System Hash Size Build Date Source Comments
    Sega Mega-CD
     ?
    CRC32
    MD5
    SHA-1
    618,526,608 CD (EU) 4903 (disc 1)
    Sega Mega-CD
     ?
    CRC32
    MD5
    SHA-1
    517,237,728 CD (EU) 4903 (disc 2)
    Sega Mega-CD
    CRC32
    MD5
    SHA-1
    618,463,104 CD (JP) G-6025 (disc 1)
    Sega Mega-CD
    CRC32
    MD5
    SHA-1
    517,174,224 CD (JP) G-6025 (disc 2)
    Sega Mega-CD
    CRC32
    MD5
    SHA-1
    616,997,808 CD (US) 4903 (disc 1)
    Sega Mega-CD
     ?
    CRC32
    MD5
    SHA-1
    616,645,008 CD (US) 4903 (disc 1)(Alt)
    Sega Mega-CD
    CRC32
    MD5
    SHA-1
    515,351,424 CD (US) 4903 (disc 2)
    Sega Mega-CD
     ?
    CRC32
    MD5
    SHA-1
    1992-09-21 Page

    References

    1. GamePro, "December 1992" (US; 1992-xx-xx), page 65
    2. Sega Visions, "November/December 1992" (US; 1992-xx-xx), page 93
    3. Popular Science (August 1993)
    4. 4.0 4.1 NEXT Generation Issue #1 (January 1995)
    5. Computer & Video Games, "July 1994" (UK; 1994-06-15), page 18
    6. Mega, "April 1993" (UK; 1993-03-18), page 26
    7. Sega Mega Drive Advanced Gaming, "June 1993" (UK; 1993-04-29), page 53
    8. MegaTech, "May 1993" (UK; 1993-04-23), page 72
    9. Video Game, "Outubro 1993" (BR; 1993-xx-xx), page 6
    10. 10.0 10.1 Night Trap Trademark Status
    11. Electronic Games (1992-1995), "December 1993" (US; 1993-11-23), page 46
    12. Sega Visions, "April/May 1994" (US; 1994-xx-xx), page 15
    13. 13.0 13.1 Sega Power, "September 1993" (UK; 1993-08-05), page 74
    14. 14.0 14.1 Mega Action, "July 1993" (UK; 1993-06-17), page 6
    15. 15.0 15.1 Edge, "October 1993" (UK; 1993-08-19), page 15
    16. MAN!AC, "11/93" (DE; 1993-xx-xx), page 50
    17. Response: "Those scenes I'm not allowed to add unfortunately. Sega owns them."
    18. File:Nighttrap mcd us rerelease manual.pdf, page 10
    19. File:Nighttrap mcd32x us manual.pdf, page 10
    20. Beep! MegaDrive, "December 1993" (JP; 1993-11-08), page 24 (26)
    21. Sega Saturn Magazine, "September 1995" (JP; 1995-08-08), page 83 (85)
    22. Consoles +, "Mars 1994" (FR; 1994-xx-xx), page 120-122 (122)
    23. Computer & Video Games, "May 1993" (UK; 1993-04-15), page 70-71 (70)
    24. Electronic Gaming Monthly, "1998 Video Game Buyer's Guide" (US; 1997-11-11), page 89
    25. Mean Machines: The Essential Sega Guide, "" (UK; 1993-11-18), page 122
    26. GameFan, "Volume 1, Issue 3: January 1993" (US; 199x-xx-xx), page 11/24 (11)
    27. GamePro, "December 1992" (US; 1992-xx-xx), page 62-63 (64)
    28. GamesMaster, "May 1993" (UK; 1993-04-19), page 27
    29. Joypad, "Mai 1994" (FR; 1994-xx-xx), page 124-125 (125)
    30. Mean Machines Sega, "April 1993" (UK; 1993-03-26), page 60-63 (60)
    31. Player One, "Mars 1994" (FR; 1994-xx-xx), page 100-101 (100)
    32. Sega Power, "September 1993" (UK; 1993-08-05), page 96
    33. Sega Force Mega, "August 1993" (UK; 1993-06-24), page 89
    34. Sega Force, "June 1993" (UK; 1993-05-06), page 64-66 (64)
    35. Video Games, "9/93" (DE; 1993-08-25), page 41 (39)
    36. Consoles +, "Juillet/Août 1995" (FR; 1995-xx-xx), page 152
    37. FLUX, "Issue #4" (US; 1995-xx-xx)
    38. GamePro, "April 1995" (US; 1995-xx-xx), page 62
    39. Mega Force, "Ete 1995" (FR; 1995-xx-xx), page 97
    40. Next Generation, "May 1995" (US; 1995-04-18), page 93
    41. Player One, "Juin 1995" (FR; 1995-xx-xx), page 100
    42. Sega Power, "May 1995" (UK; 1995-03-xx), page 53
    43. Sega Megazone, "August 1995" (AU; 1995-xx-xx), page 29
    44. VideoGames, "May 1995" (US; 1995-xx-xx), page 77


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